Our Farm

Founded by Kate and Phil Collins in 2013, Foggy River Farm is a medicinal & culinary herb farm that operates with the purpose of restoring 'connection'. 

We want to connect people to the plants that grow where they live.  We want to connect people to their food system.  We want to connect people to the source of their purchases.  We want to connect people to their own bodies - and how to use plants in simple ways to feel better. 

    Located in Ontario's beautiful Durham Region, we farm small-scale on two difference pieces of land and strive to apply the principles of permaculture in our growing practices. We call the northern property our "experimental farm" - with a long-term outlook, we are testing the limits of various growing techniques while building a food forest. The southern property is a shorter-term approach - using more of a 'market garden' style layout and cultivation technique.
    We grow over 40 different types of herbs, as well as other perennial crops including berry shrubs and fruit and nut trees. Finally, we forage our beautiful woods for wild medicinals, from evergreen trees, to wildflowers and mushrooms.

    We are constantly honing our skill and evolving our practices, with the goals of:
    • Sharing the benefits of herbal tea and botanical medicine with our wonderful community of customers
    • Being the thoughtful caretakers of healthy soil and beautiful nutrient-dense crops
    • Teaching others about sustainable farming practices
    • Increasing knowledge about beneficial plants that grow in our local ecosystem
    • Partnering on projects with local medicine makers, brewers, distillers, chefs and restaurants 

         

    Our farm is based on the principles of permaculture (rooted from the two words "permanent" and "agriculture").   Organic farming is a part of Permaculture, but not the whole part.  Permaculture is much more than an agricultural system, it is a system of living.

    Permaculture is rooted in the fact that no single problem or solution stands on its own.  In recognition of this balance, it embraces four basic principles:

    1. Working with nature rather than against it

    2. Thoughtful observation rather than thoughtless labor

    3. Each element should perform many functions rather than one

    4. Everything is connected to everything else

    By observing and learning from our environment, such as how nature replenishes its soil, how nature protects and conserves its water resources, how nature has adapted to the specific climate of an area, etc…we can learn how to imitate these natural processes in our daily living.